Duty, Honor and Historical Negationism

The United States of America – our country is the greatest country on earth and we, as citizens of the U.S.A., should be proud of our great country and our heritage. Yet, there are certain citizens who denigrate our country and its heritage, who will utilize “Historical Negationism” in their efforts to remove any vestiges of our countries heritage that they don’t agree with, such as Confederate memorials, flags, etc.

What is Duty, Honor and Historical Negationism?

The Meriam-Webster Dictionary and Wikipedia gives some of the following definitions:

Duty – https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/duty

  • obligatory tasks, conduct, service, or functions that arise from one’s position (as in life or in a group)
  • a moral or legal obligation

Honor – https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/honor

  • one whose worth brings respect or fame
  • a keen sense of ethical conduct

Negation – https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/negation

  • the action or logical operation of negating or making negative
  • something that is the absence of something actual

Negationist – https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/negationist

  • an adherent of a doctrine or theory of mere negation

Historical Negationism – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_negationism

  • Historical Negationism or denialism is an illegitimate distortion of the historical record

We have a suggestion to those citizens who would utilize “Historical Negationism” to remove any vestiges of our countries heritage that they don’t agree with, such as Confederate memorials, flags, etc. They should study and learn from the examples of persons who actually fought in the Civil War and from their actions both during and after the Civil War.

Gettysburg 50th Anniversary Reunion, 1913
Gettysburg 50th Anniversary Reunion, 1913; photo courtesy Library of Congress

Example 1 – the actions of Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton, commander of Company C, 20th Regiment Virginia Cavalry, CSA, during and after the Civil War

Lt Col Elihu Hutton CSA
Lt Col Elihu Hutton CSA, Company C, 20th Virginia Cavalry

The actions listed below demonstrate the duty and honor displayed by Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton CSA during and after the Civil War, especially when the following facts are considered:

  • Alfred Hutton, who was a civilian and the older brother of Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton CSA, was arrested by Union authorities in 1861 and imprisoned in Camp Chase prisoner of war camp located in Ohio, and not released until later in 1862.
  • Eugenius Hutton, the younger brother of Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton CSA, was killed in action at the Battle of Bunker Hill during the Civil War.
  • Col. Elihu Hutton CSA was wounded in action multiple times during the Civil War.
  • Many of the soldiers under the command of Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton CSA were killed, wounded or captured during the Civil War.

Reports of Committees of the Senate of the United States for the First and Second Sessions of the Forty-Sixth Congress 1879-1880, the 2nd Session, Report No. 192, dated February 2, 1880.

The Committee on Pensions, to whom was referred the petition of Jesse F. Phares for a pension have examined the same and the papers therewith submitted, and report:

The facts in the case are few and clearly proven: At the outbreak of the rebellion was a resident of Randolph County, in the State of Virginia; that he entered the service of the government about the month of June, 1861, as a scout, serving under Generals McLellan, Milroy, Kelly, and others, and by reason of his intimate knowledge of the country and his intelligence, zeal, and daring, rendering very valuable service to the Union cause. In April, 1863, the Confederate General Imboden advanced upon the Union forces at Beverly, W. Va., commanded by Col. Geo. R. Latham, commanding Fifth West Virginia Cavalry. In the advance Phares, who was then on duty outside the Union pickets, was surprised by a party of Confederate troops, and refusing to halt when ordered, was shot through the body, but retained his saddle until he reached the Union lines. The following are extracts from the affidavits of Col. Geo. R. Latham, Fifth Regiment West Virginia Cavalry (Union), and of Lieut. Col. Elihu Hutton, Twentieth Regiment Virginia Cavalry (Confederate).

“Lieutenant-Colonel Hutton says:

“‘During the late civil war I was lieutenant-colonel of the Twentieth Regiment Virginia Cavalry (confederate service) and served principally on the West Virginia frontier, where it was well known who were acting as scouts and guides for the Federal forces in that vicinity, and said Jesse F. Phares was well known to be one of the most active and dangerous scouts and guides operating against us. His knowledge of the country was thorough; he was smart, daring, and vigilant and capable of great endurance. In consequence of the knowledge we possessed of this fact every possible exertion was made on our part to capture him, but without success until the 23rd day of April, 1863, when General Imboden advanced upon the Federal forces then stationed at Beverly commanded by Colonel George R. Latham.

“In order to cut off all scouts that might be outside the Federal pickets, we sent by night a party of men through the woods to gain the road near the outside Federal picket post before day-light on the morning of April 23, 1863. About day-light said Phares, who was thus cut off approached said party of men on horse-back and was ordered to halt, but dashed forward and past the men, when he was fired upon by them, one ball taking effect, passing through his body—through the lungs—from the effects of which he is now almost wholly disabled. He retained his seat, however, until he reached the Federal picket and gave information of our advance.

“Beverly was evacuated the same day by the Federal forces and occupied by the confederates, and Phares fell into our hands.

“He was cared for by me personally about fifteen days, but a large amount of goods, general merchandise, groceries, &c., household furniture, and other personal property, to the value of several thousand dollars, fell into confederate hands and was used or destroyed by them, leaving him and his family in very destitute circumstances, in which condition, principally in consequence of his disability, they remain to this time. He has four children living, and one, his oldest, a daughter, died of consumption in 1870, induced by hardships and exposure, and his wife is worn down by care and labor.

“Said Phares is about forty-three years of age, and has been for several years failing rapidly in physical strength, in consequence of the wound above referred to.”

The final decision rendered by The Committee on Pensions was thus:

The petitioner has not made application for a pension to the Pension Office, as under the uniform ruling of that office he was not entitled to a pension for the reason that he was not a regularly enlisted soldier. For the same reason the committee do not feel at liberty to report a bill in favor of the petitioner, and ask to be discharged from further consideration of the petition.

Congressional Record: Proceedings and Debates of the Forty-Seventh Congress, First Session, Volume XIII, 1882

page 2600,  proceedings of April 5, 1882

This was another petition by Jesse F. Phares for a military disability pension for injuries he received during the Civil War on April 23, 1863 after his initial petition for a military disability pension was rejected. The testimony of Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton was again entered and recorded on the record in support of Jesse F. Phares.

It should be noted there were numerous Senators who voted against this petition for a disability pension, but the objections were overcome by vote and a bill was passed for granting a military disability pension to Jesse F Phares. The final vote was YEAS-24, NAYS-19, ABSENT-33.

Index to the Reports of Committees of the First Session of the Forty-Seventh Congress, 1st Session, Report No. 1051, dated April 14, 1882

The Committee on Invalid Pensions, to whom was referred the bill (S.915) granting a pension to Jessee F. Phares, have carefully examined the same, and report favorably the Senate report in this case:

The report closed with the following passage:

The Senate bill and report are adopted by the Committee on Invalid Pensions, and reported to the House with the recommendation that said Senate bill pass.

Jesse F. Phares was finally granted a military disability pension on March 3, 1883 under certificate number 247730.

Jesse F. Phares probably owed his life due to the personal care given him by Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton CSA for fifteen days when he was wounded on April 23, 1863. In all likelihood, Jesse F. Phares would probably have died from his wounds without the special care personally rendered by Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton CSA.

Likewise, Jesse F. Phares received his military disability pension due in part to the testimony and support of Lt. Col. Elihu Hutton CSA on his behalf.

It is interesting to note that Jesse F. Phares named a son, who was born in 1868, Elihu Phares.

Example 2 – Celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2-4, 1913

Gettysburg 50th Anniversary Reunion, 1913, Under Blue and Gray
Gettysburg 50th Anniversary Reunion, 1913, Under Blue and Gray, photo courtesy Library of Congress
The Gettysburg Compiler: Wednesday, July 02, 1913, page 1

50th ANNIVERSARY IS HERE
THE BLUE AND GRAY IN POSSESSION OF GETTYSBURG
The Most Unique Camp Ever Held Sends a Message of Peace to The World

The Gettysburg Compiler: Wednesday, July 02, 1913, page 2

BATTLE’S GREATEST POEM

Many poems have had Gettysburg as the theme many of them have been good but many would not take first rank. It is believed that of the poems that have been written, the one that would rank first in its impelling rhythm, its thrilling inspiration, its majesty of thought and its great human message is “High Tide at Gettysburg,” by Will Henry Thompson. He was a Southern poet, born in Georgia, serving in the Confederate army throughout the Civil War, removing to Indiana he practiced law at Crawfordsville. Later he emigrated to Washington Territory, residing in Seattle.

HIGH TIDE AT GETTYSBURG.
By Will Henry Thompson

A cloud possessed the hollow field,
The gathering battle’s smoky shield,
Athwart, the gloom the lightning flashed,
And through the cloud some horsemen dashed
And from the heights the thunder pealed.

Then at the brief command of Lee
Moved out that matchless infantry,
With Pickett leading grandly down
To rush against the roaring crown
Of those dread heights of destiny.

Far heard above the angry guns
A cry across the tumult runs,
The voice that rang thro’ Shiloh’s woods,
And Chickamauga’s solitudes
The fierce South cheering on her sons.

Ah, how the withering tempest blew
Against the front of Pettigrew!
A khamsin wind that scorch’d and sing’d
Like that infernal flame that fringed
The British squares at Waterloo!

A thousand fell where Kemper led,
A thousand died where Garnett bled:
In blinding flame and strangling smoke
The remnant through the batteries broke
And crossed the works with Armistead.

“Once more in glory’s van with me!”
Virginia cried to Tennessee.
We two, together, come what may,
Shall stand upon these works today
The reddest day in history!”

Brave Tennessee! In reckless way
Virginia heard her comrade say:
“Close round this rent and riddled rag!”
What time she set her battle flag
Amid the guns of Doubleday.

But who shall break the guards that wait?
Before the awful face of Fate?
The tattered standards of the South
Were shriveled at the cannon’s mouth,
And all her hopes were desolate.

In vain the Tennessean set
His breast against the bayonet!
In vain Virginia charged and raged,
A tigress in her wrath uncaged,
Till all the hill was red and wet!

Above the bayonets, mixed and crossed,
Men saw a gray, gigantic ghost
Receding through the battle cloud,
And heard across the tempset loud
The death-cry of a nation lost!

The brave went down! Without disgrace
They leaped to Ruin’s red embrace;
They only heard fame’s thunders wake,
And saw the dazzling sun-burst break
In smiles on Glory’s bloody face!

Fold up the banners! Smelt the guns!
Love rules. Her gentler purpose runs.
A mighty mother turns in tears
The pages of her battle years,
Lamenting all her fallen sons!

Gettysburg 50th Anniversary Reunion, 1913, The Reunion at "Bloody Angle"
Gettysburg 50th Anniversary Reunion, 1913, The Reunion at “Bloody Angle”, photo courtesy Library of Congress
The Washington Post: Friday, June 27, 1913, page 3

BLUE GREET THE GRAY
Confederates Get Warm Welcome in Gettysburg
CROWDS SHAKE THEIR HANDS

The Washington Post: Sunday, June 29, 1913, page 2

Boy Scouts Arrive

Three hundred and fifty Philadelphia boy scouts arrived this evening and were scattered about the camp at various stations where they will assist the veterans in any manner possible.

The Washington Post: Tuesday, July 1, 1913, page 1

OLD FOES IN TEARS
Dramatic Scenes Mark Cavalry Reunion at Gettysburg
Nearly 40,000 in Camp

The Washington Post: Tuesday, July 1, 1913, page 2

Hats Off to Wearers of Gray

While the men in gray stood waiting in the blazing sun for the Virginia governor to pass more than 100 automobiles filled with sightseers scurried over the road in front of them. Every man, busy as he might have been before he reached the straggling column lifted his hat and kept it off until he passed the end of the line.

Gen Sickles, the only corps commander of the Union army on the field was the center of attraction of hundreds of men in gray. He sat on the porch of the Rogers House on the field near the spot where he was shot and there stood hand-shaking with all those present.

Before the Southerners left the Rogers House they shouldered the general, carried him out into the battlefield, and stood him up before the camera fire and moving picture machines.

Stonewall Brigade Arrives

A picturesque feature of the afternoon was the arrival of the Stonewall brigade of Virginia veterans, headed by Col Chew. They carried their original battle-flag, tattered and torn and showing bullet holes. Less than 100 survivors of this famous fighting band were in line, but their appearance in the streets of Gettysburg aroused unbounded enthusiasm.

The Washington Post: Wednesday, July 2, 1913, page 1

VETERANS DEFY SUN

Doctors Astonished at Mettle of Men at Gettysburg

REUNION FORMALLY OPENED

Thermometer 102 in the Shade as Crowd Fills Big Tent

Address of Gen. Young, United Confederate Veterans’ Commander, Greeted With Cheers – Many Old Men Exhausted by Heat, but Few Out-and-Out Prostrations Are Reported – Pickett’s Men Gather Where Charge Began.

The Washington Post: Wednesday, July 2, 1913, page 2

Town Worse Than Camp

Downtown in Gettysburg, where the temperature was even higher than in camp there were more cases of temporary exhaustion treated at emergency stations and at the Pennsylvania Health Department Hospital.

Although the army doctors were not given to talking about such matters, it was evident tonight that many of the old soldiers would have been better off if they had not undertaken the trip here.

The Washington Post: Sunday, July 6, 1913, page 1

JOIN BLUE AND GRAY

Gettysburg, Pa., July 5 – The great reunion of the blue and gray commemorating the 50th anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg practically came to an end today, although the camp where more than 50,000 old soldiers were cared for during the week will not officially close until tomorrow.

The Washington Post: Sunday, July 6, 1913, page 2

Affection Shown Everywhere

“I have never seen such an exhibition of affection,” said Co. Hopkins. “I believe I express the sentiment of all those 50,000 men when I say I am sorry it is over. But it is a wonderful thing for us to remember. I believe it will have far-reaching results, for every man who was there and felt the spirit of that reunion, whether he be from the North or the South, will go home and preach good will for the rest of his life.”

The Christian Advocate, Volume 88, page 970, July 17, 1913

Mr. Wilson’s Speech

“We have found one another again as brothers and comrades in arms, enemies no longer, generous friends rather, our battles long past, the quarrel forgotten – except that we shall not forget the splendid valor, the manly devotion of the men then arrayed against one another, now grasping hands and smiling into each other’s eyes.”

(From part of the speech delivered by President Wilson at the July 04, 1913 Gettysburg Reunion)

HERITAGE, NOT HATE

Resolutions of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

The resolution of the Sons of Confederate Veterans against hate groups:

http://www.scv.org/new/scv-resolution-on-hate-groups/

SCV Resolution on Hate Groups

Friday, September 3, 2010

Battleflag Resolution From Anderson Reunion

Resolution adopted at the Anderson Convention offered by Charles Kelly Barrow, Cmdr, Army of Tennessee, SCV

WHEREAS, the approach of the Sesquicentennial will be a time to educate not only the people of these United States but of the world; and WHEREAS, the most recognized symbol of the Confederate States is the Battle Flag, a flag each of us hold dear; and

WHEREAS, the use of the Confederate Battle Flag by extremist political groups and individuals who seek to clothe themselves in respectability by misappropriating the banner under which our southern ancestors fought for a Just Cause which is as noble as much latter day is ignoble; and

WHEREAS, the Sons of Confederate Veterans are the true inheritors of legacy and symbols for which the Confederate Veterans fought and died; and

WHEREAS, the Sons of Confederate Veterans does denounce the use of the Confederate Battle Flag and any other Confederate symbol by any hate group and/or the Ku Klux Klan as the desecration of a symbol to which any hate group and/or the Ku Klux Klan has no claim; and

WHEREAS, the misuse of the Confederate Battle Flag by any extremist group or individual espousing political extremism and/or racial superiority degrades the Confederate Battle Flag and maligns the noble purpose of our ancestors who fought against extreme odds for what they knew was just, right, and constitutional; and WHEREAS, the misuse of other flags and symbols of the Confederate States of America and the Confederate States Army, Navy, and Marines is similarly degrading,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Sons of Confederate Veterans in General Convention assembled in Anderson, South Carolina, does hereby condemn in the strongest terms possible the use of the Confederate Battle Flag or any other flag, symbol, seal, title or name bearing any relationship whatsoever to the Confederate States of America or the armed forces of that Government by any such extremist group or individual, of whatever name or designation by which know, and

LET IT BE FUTHER RESOVLED, that the Sons of Confederate Veterans in General Convention assembled, does hereby condemn in the strongest terms possible the inappropriate use of the Confederate Battle Flag or any other flag, seal, title or name bearing any relationship whatsoever to the Confederate States of America or the armed forces of that Government of the Confederate States of America by individuals or groups of individuals, organized or unorganized, who espouse political extremism or racial superiority and that this resolution shall be made known to all media outlets now and throughout the years of the Sesquicentennial and it shall be made patent and entered into the permanent records and archives of the General Headquarters of the Sons of Confederate Veterans at Elm Springs in Columbia, Tennessee.

The resolution of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War supporting the flying of the Confederate battle flag as a historical piece of this nation’s history and their opposition to the removal of any Confederate monuments or markers.

http://suvcw.org/flagres.htm

A resolution in support of the display of the Confederate Battle Flag.

WHEREAS, we, the members of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, condemn the use of the confederate battle flag, as well as the flag of the United States, by any and all hate groups; and

WHEREAS, we, the members of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, support the flying of the Confederate battle flag as a historical piece of this nation’s history; and

WHEREAS, we, the members of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, oppose the removal of any Confederate monuments or markers to those gallant soldiers in the former Confederate States, and strongly oppose the removal of ANY reminders of this nation’s bloodiest war on the grounds of it being “politically correct;” and

WHEREAS, we, as the descendants of Union soldiers and sailors who as members of the Grand Army of the Republic met in joint reunions with the Confederate veterans under both flags in those bonds of Fraternal Friendship, pledge our support and admiration for those gallant soldiers and of their respective flags;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we, the members of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War in 119th Annual National Encampment, hereby adopt this resolution.

Dated in Lansing, Michigan, on this nineteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord Two thousand.

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